ARCAthens Virtual Residency

ARCAthens Virtual Residency

We are pleased to launch our ARCAthens Virtual Residency program, always featuring two artists, one in Greece, and the other in the Bronx, New York. They will be in conversation for one month posting daily on Instagram.  Mediated by curator and ARCAthens Executive Director Aristides Logothetis, the artists will be working with social media as their medium to create a bridge between two vibrant communities during the COVID 19 pandemic. The conversations they make through Instagram which you can follow at @arc_athens will be documented on this site, as well as the culminating public zoom conversation at the end of their residency.

The AVR provides two Artist Fellows the opportunity and support to engage in a creative and productive dialogue during this period of social distancing. The AVR offers a inter-continental conversation between two artists, mediated by a curator, and shared openly by others. We intend to bridge the constraints imposed by the pandemic by inviting artists to challenge their isolation, freely discuss their hopes and fears, and find insights and resources through a compelling exchange of ideas.

We are delighted to introduce our second ARCAthens Virtual Residency Fellows
July 20-August 14

Michael Paul Britto and Eirini Linardaki

Michael Paul Britto

Michael Paul Britto’s interdisciplinary practice spans a broad scope of mediums from videos to digital photography, sculpture, collage, and performance. He has a BA from the City College, NY. His past residencies include: The New Museum, Smack Mellon, The Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation and LMCC. He has exhibited at El Museo del Barrio, The Studio Museum of Harlem and The Kitchen in (NY) as well as internationally at The Zacheta National Gallery (Warsaw), and the Victoria and Albert Museum (London). Britto has been written about in The New York Times, Art In America and The Brooklyn Rail. He is also a teaching artist, and the co-founder of the “Young Men Of Color” film / video training program at Downtown Community Television in New York City. https://www.brittofied.com/

My work is most concerned with the misconceptions and assumptions communicated by mass media in The United States. My practice creates a platform where I can address political and cultural awareness, using the customary, as metaphor. I encourage the viewer to think about socially nurtured assumptions of blackness, poverty, youth, and the characteristics of acceptable behavior, to create a perspective that is more responsive than reactionary. By appropriating the appropriated (i.e. pop culture) and mining historical references, I believe that my messages resonate from a globally shared influence of “American” culture.
Michael Paul Britto

Eirini Linardaki

Eirini Linardaki was born in Athens and studied at Limerick L.I.T., Ireland, Berlin and Marseille. She lived in France for more than twenty years before moving to the island Crete, where she is now based, developing projects mainly in the public sphere, on Crete, Athens, Paris and New York.She has exhibited at the Boijmans Museum, Rotterdam, Stegi, Onassis Cultural center Athens, House of Cyprus in Greece, Salon de Montrouge, Fri-Art Kunsthalle, Fribourg; Natural History Museum, Geneva, Macedonian Museum of Contemporary Art, Hamburg Kunsthaus, Rutgers University, NJ, Institut Français d’Athènes, John Jay College, Anya and Andrew Shiva gallery, Lower East Side Girls Club, NYC, Radiator Gallery, NYC, Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural and Educational Center, NYC.In January 2020 she was one of the curators of the Night of Ideas and Philosophy, for the French Institute of Greece.In February 2020 she organized and curated a «residency in the workplace» and exhibition program “Occupy # 1, New York” in collaboration with the Consulate General of Greece in New York and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the USA, where artists were invited to work within the offices and in collaboration with administrative staff of the Consulate and create art through dialogue with them. https://linardakiparisot.wixsite.com/linardaki-parisot

“At this time of historic global crisis, art is helping and serving people in their communities. I believe that right now in history art is keeping pace with social change.Sometimes persistent social issues knock on our door and enter our dreams, becoming a defining aspect of a useful artistic vision. I experience this through my research, my practice and my overall journey as an artist. The complexity and persistent presence of the issues I face in various cities and communities become part of my artwork, expressed through materials found and generated by the ambitions of the participants. “

Instagram Visual Conversation #2

ARCAthens Virtual Residency #2 is our second residency of this season, featuring our next AVR Fellows, Michael Paul Britto, from the Bronx, New York, and Eirini Linardaki, from Athens, Greece. Their Instagram conversation/takeover is taking place from July 20-August 14, 2020, and will be posted in chronological order, with the most recent date first.

week 4: #gender

week 3: #fear/fatigue

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Curatorial Reflections: Fear/Fatigue In the AVR2’s third week, Michael Paul Britto and Eirini Linardaki’s visual conversation takes us on a journey of their apprehensions as well as deep seated fears. A brief synopsis: Eirini starts us with a collage interpretation of the #PearlHarbor attack giving the horrible event a new life, “as a sort of sculpture” focusing on the “composition and the shape of the explosion.” Michael’s video “Black Boy” responds by illuminating another fear, the “Scarcity Mindset”, the belief that there will never be enough, resulting in feelings of fear, stress, and anxiety. He follows up with a digital collage of #MalcomX reminding us that “the greatest enemy a man can have is fear.” Eirini then announces a show she is curating about “people living on the edge of society,” and with another collage of an explosion inspired by Beirut. Michael’s collage “The Overseer” hints at strange relations induced by the fear of power, and follows with “A White Woman’s Tears”, a sculpture about the weaponized threat of white woman fragility. Eirini’s watercolor of a homeless woman in California, reminds of struggles women continue to endure just as some women navigate power and privilege. Her watercolor “Wreck of Hope_Luxor Air” combines a post-explosion scenario with military presence, to which Michael’s collage, #Shock&Awe reminds us that “the racial biases and economic vulnerabilities of poor and working-class whites through racially coded rhetoric on crime and welfare” have been used by conservative white elites to put “blacks back "in their place.”” Military slaughter, accidents, and explosions, meet social fears of a system which subjugates the “other” whether defined by race, sex, or class. But where is the other theme “Fatigue”? I believe the trace of that sibling theme, fatigue, is found in all of these images as they are residual and absurd in their senselessness and endurance. Next week the Fellows explore Gender. Join the conversation by commenting and sharing! Yours, Aristides #Week3 #Fear #Fatigue #MichaelPaulBritto #EiriniLinardaki #AAVirtualResidency #AVR #AVR2 #InstagramTakeover #ScarcityMindset #Beirut #WhiteWomanFragility

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Michael Paul Britto Shock & Awe, Untitled #20, 2015 Cut Magazine Paper, Gesso Board Dimensions 6 in X 6 in “Jim Crow and mass incarceration have similar political origins…both caste systems were born in part, due to desire among white elites to exploit the resentments, vulnerabilities and racial biases of poor and working-class whites for political or economic gain. Segregation laws were proposed as part of a deliberate and strategic effort to deflect anger and hostility that have been brewing against the white elite away from them and toward African Americans. The birth of mass incarceration can be traced to a similar political dynamic. Conservatives in the 1960s and 1970s sought to appeal to the racial biases and economic vulnerabilities of poor and working-class whites through racially coded rhetoric on crime and welfare. In both cases, the racial opportunists offered few, if any, economic reforms to address the legitimate economic anxieties of poor and working-class whites, proposing instead a crackdown on the racially defined "others." In the early years of Jim Crow, conservative white elites competed with each other by passing ever more stringent and oppressive Jim Crow legislation. A century later, politicians in the early years of the drug war competed with each other to prove who could be tougher on crime by passing ever harsher drug laws- a thinly veiled effort to appeal to poor and working-class whites who, once again, proved they were willing to forego economic and structural reform in exchange for an apparent effort to put blacks back "in their place.” ― Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness #postedbymichaelpaulbritto #movement #aavirtualresidency #avr2 #instagramtakeover #michaelpaulbritto #eirinilinardaki #brittofied #blacklivesmatter #blm #manofcolor #linardakiandco #fearfatigue #racialbias #massincarceration #jimcrow

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Week 2: #movement

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Curatorial Reflections: Movement. In the second week of the AVR2, Michael Paul Britto and Eirini Linardaki visually converse about “Movement”, the “notion of motion” (whether that manifests as a record of the activity of the individual or collective body), as well as the record of the activity of the mind, as seen in social movements. The conversation starts with Michael’s haunting self-portrait titled #Anxiety, with the artist shaking his head in possible disapproval, disbelief, or confusion, all induced by anxieties which we can all relate with these days, to varying degrees and intimacy. Eirini’s project of using movable images to reconstruct the tragic #Challenger explosion, seen widely as a live television broadcast, reminds us of the role of failure in all our high-reaching endeavors… Eirini’s figurative installation of diverse children in movement, and Michael’s “Army of Me” reference social movements while formally conversing about the figure as subject, further investigated in his video “I'm A Slave 4 U”, a recast and reworked #BritneySpears work to illustrate common slave practices, to which Eirini responds with her and Vincent Parisot’s site-specific collaboration illuminating the metaphors of borders, the refugee crisis, as well as the inherent motion of the seemingly static or stable. Eirini’s performance on an itinerant raft in different contexts “representing the need of so many humans in this world needing to flee through borders to a better life,” reminds us that geopolitical borders are artificial constructs, to which Michael responds by focusing on the moment of the motion in a fall, and the interior borders: the ones in our minds and hearts, those of “isolation, anger, and resentment” -further examined in his “Stages Of Relations”. Eirini then closes the week by reminding us of the social borders women are often confronted with noting how slow the movement has been to break those down. AVR2 Fellows start Week 3 tomorrow, #Fear and #Fatigue, and I encourage you to join the conversation by commenting and sharing! Yours, Aristides #Week2 #Movement #MichaelPaulBritto #EiriniLinardaki #AAVirtualResidency #AVR #AVR2 #InstagramTakeover

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The thing that comes_Challenger. Transformable collage, magnetic drawings. Residency at LowerEastside Girls Club, 2019. The particularity of this collage is that the participants can move the magnetic parts to recompose the artwork made of drawings of light and matter explosions, gigantic fireworks against a dark charcoal sky. Producing a sight of transformable tragedy, the images are drawn from the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion in 1986. The images and shape of the explosion are very recognizable as so many people (including school classes) witnessed the launch on live television broadcast because of the presence of high school teacher Christa McAuliffe, who would have been the first teacher in space. The exact timing of the death of the crew is unknown; several crew members are known to have survived the initial breakup of the spacecraft. The shuttle had no escape system, and the impact of the crew compartment at terminal velocity with the ocean surface was too violent to be survivable. #PostedByEiriniLinardaki #movement #AAVirtualResidency #AVR2 #InstagramTakeover #MichaelPaulBritto #EiriniLinardaki #linardakiandco #brittofied #contemporaryartnyc #les #lowereastsidegirlsclub #lowereastside #contemporarydrawing #contemporaryartcrete #spaceshuttlechallenger #fineart #nasahistory #spaceshuttlechallenger #space #challenger #history #womenshistorymonth #spaceprogram #christamcauliffe

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Week 1: #topology/misconceptions

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Curatorial Reflections: AVR2, the second ARCAthens Virtual Residency, welcomes #BronxArtist Michael Paul Britto and #GreekArtist Eirini Linardaki, based in #Heraklion #Crete, to an Instagram Takeover, where these two wonderful artists engage in a visual conversation. 
 As the first week closes and we look back and consider the theme: Topology/Misconceptions, the #Fellows use their original images, mostly of their artwork, to establish a conversation that quickly moves us from an introduction of place or person to introductions of inspirations and motives. Through their images and words, both Fellows invite us to consider issues regarding the human condition: race, violence, tragedy, war, suicide. In trying to illuminate relations to the weekly theme, Topology/Misconceptions, I found myself considering the theme itself and wondering if the Fellows’ elusive adherence to it may be of note: Is topology itself understood as a misconception? Is topology a study of “space” or of the heart and the soul? Is the landscape the psyche itself? This “misconception” or contradiction may be reflected in both Eirini’s ”Pushing Huey Into the Ocean”, an image of the drowning “savior” #helicopter (from the #VietnamWar evacuation, code-named Operation Frequent Wind) which had to be sacrificed to the sea due to lack of space, to Michael’s 2010 “Black Pride, White Privilege", a mirror sculpture operating within a mirrored landscape of many perceptive layers, where we are asked to consider multiple conceptual layers and meanings, even the layer of how the text “Pride Privilege” itself is perceived. Next week’s theme is #Movement and I am excited to see what awaits us! Meanwhile, please share your thoughts with us here, and stay healthy, hopeful, and focused!

Yours,
Aristides Logothetis #Week1 #Topology / #Misconceptions #MichaelPaulBritto #EiriniLinardaki #AAVirtualResidency #AVR2 #instagramtakeover

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